The calculation of the aggregate rating for categories has been fixed.

Two troubleshooting features were added: a report for you and a debug log for me.

Troubleshooting

Search engines expect reviews to be from actual people so review markup requires a valid reviewer’s name. The plugin excludes testimonials without a name field. It doesn’t attempt to qualify them, it just checks if they are empty. I added a simple report of testimonials where the name field is empty.

The debug log will capture important details during the markup generation for a view and for the [testimonial_aggregate_rating] shortcode. When enabled, the logging only happens when an administrator views a page with the markup. When you have questions about your markup, download the log file and attach it to a support ticket. Then be sure to disable it as it will quickly create a large file.

New shortcode

A new shortcode, [testimonial_aggregate_count], displays the number of testimonials used in the aggregate rating calculation. Why is this needed? As explained above, testimonials without a reviewer’s name will be excluded so the count may be different than the other [testimonial_count] shortcode. An example use:

We have [testimonial_aggregate_count] reviews!
[testimonial_aggregate_rating]

Aggregate bug

A bug was fixed where the maximum rating value (5/5) was used for the aggregate calculation instead of the actual ratings. This occurred when there was a star rating field in the custom fields but the Rating markup field option was not changed from the default setting to that star rating field.

The Rating markup field is not required and it’s easy to overlook. Here’s the bottom line: No rating means no aggregate. If you want to use aggregate ratings, you must select an option for the Rating markup field.

I will work on improving the documentation.

Always tweaking

And I reworked the settings pages to help explain how it all works.


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Chris Dillon

About the author: Chris Dillon is a WordPress developer in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. When not trying to figure out why his plugins aren't working, he walks his rescue dog Gordo, takes a nap in the backyard or makes a mess in the kitchen.